I think pupfish are great.

Nothing in Biology Makes Sense!

One of the central hypotheses about how the diversity of life is generated is known as “adaptive radiation“. This term, popularized by G.G. Simpson in the mid 20th century, encapsulates an idea that is relatively easy to grasp: that the spectacular arrays of morphological and species diversity that we observe in the world are often the result of great bursts of speciation and morphological change. These bursts occur because a single species colonizes a new area, acquires a new adaptation, or suddenly escapes its competitors or natural enemies (possibly by their extinction). This opens up a new universe of possible lifestyles that evolution then drives that species to take up by rapid diversification. Think of the Hawaiian honeycreepers or Darwin’s finches.

The idea holds great sway because it is simple and powerful, but testing it empirically has proven very difficult. This is in part because the actual…

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About aquaticbiology

I'm a person from the San Francisco Bay Area. I like reading, the movies, my family, and biology. I think the science blogosphere is really fantastic and this is my blog about aquatic biology and the life sciences - along with digressions into science-art and commentary. Enjoy!
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